A Theological Analysis of Issues Arising from the Christian Asante Chief’s Relationship with the Black Stool (Akonwa Tuntum)

Samuel Ofori

Issue: Vol.2  No.1 April 2020 Article 7 pp. 50-57
DOI : https://doi.org/10.38159/motbit.2020047    |   Published online 14th May 2020.
© 2020 The Author(s). This is an open access article under the CCBY license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).

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One of several issues of contention that have created a gulf between Christianity and the traditional Asante chieftaincy institution is the chief’s relationship with the black stool. The general perception of Christians is that the black stool is an object of worship, it is demonic and should be avoided by Christian chiefs. This paper theologically analyzes the issues of contention in the Christian chief’s relationship with the black stool and presents a Christian response to guide them. This is an empirical qualitative study, and it uses a phenomenological approach to understand the phenomena related to the issues of contention in the Christianity-chieftaincy encounter. The method of obtaining information included interviews of fifty (50) Christian Asante chiefs, a representative group obtained by the purposeful sampling method. Information was also obtained through personal observation of some of the traditional religious rituals they perform. The issues of contention were then examined in the light of scripture in order to help bridge the seeming gulf between Asante chieftaincy and Christianity. This research has established the fact that the black stool is not a demonic object. In fact, the issues of contention in the Christianity and chieftaincy encounter, relating to the black stool, have arisen not only from a lack of understanding and proper appreciation of the traditional rituals, but also from lack of proper understanding and poor interpretation of scriptural texts used in relating the gospel to the chieftaincy institution.

Keywords: Tradition, ritual, Christianity, Black stool (Akonwa Tuntum), worship.

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Samuel Ofori, Ph.D. is a Lecturer in the School of Theology, Mission and Leadership. Pentecost University College. Ghana. Email: samuelofori_148@yahoo.com

Ofori, Samuel. “A Theological Analysis of Issues Arising from the Christian Asante Chief’s Relationship with the Black Stool (Akonwa Tuntum).” Journal of Mother-Tongue Biblical Hermeneutics and Theology 2, no. 1 (2020): 50-57. https://doi.org/10.38159/motbit.2020047

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© 2020 The Author(s). Published and Maintained by Noyam Publishers. This is an open access article under the CCBY license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).